Archive for the ‘Media and Society’ category

SLOW – The Most Popular TV in Norway

July 15, 2013

Bergensbanen minutt for minutt

A seven-hour train ride, a 134-hour ferry ride — in real time. These are two of the most popular shows in Norway, with huge, record-breaking numbers. It seems that hyperconnected cell phone addicts want peace. But they still want their TV. Whodathunkit? Details here, from NPR’s On The Media. Wikipedia–Slow TV. Clips: Bergensbanen Train  Hurtigruten Ferry.

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Internet Economy

June 6, 2013

This is InterestingJaron Lanier, internet & MIDI pioneer, all purpose iconoclast, and author of “You are Not a Gadget” and the recently released “Who Owns the Future” likes to turn our conventional assumptions about the web upside down. Interviewed this week by Matt Miller, he talked about how the internet as it’s currently constructed tends to suck the air out of the middle class, encouraging all of us to give away our creativity to the people with the biggest computers. Whatever you think about the inevitability of our current networking model, you’ll find things to think about in this podcast. It’s part of Miller’s new podcast, “This is Interesting.” Available from iTunes and LA public radio station KCRW.

[Update — On June 9, the NY Times published a long editorial by Lanier on the front page of the Sunday Op-Ed.]

XBox One Kinect Video

May 22, 2013

Xbox One KinectArs Technica posted a short video demonstrating some of the very impressive technology driving the new Kinect, which is part of the Xbox One, introduced yesterday. I was particularly impressed with the amount of 3D detail the system can process and interpret in real time. And the startling amount of ambient noise it can filter out. Check it out. It might just give you a new way of looking at the future of user interface design.

Editor’s Lounge Videos Posted

April 15, 2012

If you’re not going to make it to Vegas this year and are looking for a bit of pre-show analysis, check out the Editors Lounge Pre-NAB Panel Discussion Video. It features Terry Curren, Michael Kammes,  Mark Raudonis, and I talking about such things as how the growing move to tablet devices and internet distribution is changing life for content creators. But we get into the gear, too, with a discussion about FCP-X, Premiere, Media Composer, Lightworks, and, yes, even the resurgence of the typewriter. Masterfully moderated by Deborah Kaufman, it makes for interesting viewing (and looks crystal clear at full res).

The Right to Be Forgotten

January 25, 2012

Here’s a heady and novel idea, a law that would do the following:

  • Force websites to tell consumers why their data is being collected and retain it only as long as necessary.
  • If data is stolen, require notification within 24 hours.
  • Offer consumers the right to move their data from one service to another.
  • Create the “right to be forgotten,” allowing a user to have his or her data on a site deleted forever.

Needless to say, this isn’t coming from a regulatory agency in the US. It’s being proposed by the European Commission. If passed by the European Parliament, it would go into effect in 2014 and apply to all nations in Europe.

For details, check out this article from Tuesday’s New York Times.

That Post Show — A Little Squirt of Dopamine

January 25, 2012

Last week, I participated in another episode of Kanen Flowers’ “That Post Show” podcast — this time covering the skill-set you’ll need in order to succeed in the real world of the professional editing room. The episode is entitled “Squirt of Dopamine” and also features Mike J. Nichols, Paul Zadie and, of course, Kanen. I think you’ll find it interesting listening. Check it out via iTunes or get it from the shownotes page.

IATSE Health Plan

November 15, 2011

Preparing for upcoming contract negotiations, the IATSE has been reaching out to the membership for feedback about our health plan. I went to a town hall meeting near LAX last night hosted by IA President Matt Loeb and VP Mike Miller, and I have to say that it was one of the best large-group IA meetings I’ve ever been to. The attitude, openness and intelligence of the leadership was terrific, and I was proud to be a member of this organization.

Our current contract expires at the end of July, and the chief challenge is going to be the medical plan. For details, we heard presentations by John Garner and David Wescoe, who articulately laid out some of the issues. By many measures we have one of the best plans in the nation, with lots of options, high quality care, and low out-of-pocket costs. But the plan is projected to need a lot of money over the next three years. Solving that problem will undoubtedly be contentious, and members would be well advised to learn as much as they can about it. There will be another meeting tonight in Burbank. You can also watch videos from previous meetings on the IA website.